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TV Shows - Something So Right

Something So Right is an American television situation comedy which ran on two different networks during its time on the air, and in reruns on the USA Network for a number of years after its cancellation. Something So Right starred Mel Harris as Carly Davis, a twice-divorced party planner who had married Jack Farrell (Jere Burns), a divorced English teacher. They had three children, one from each of their former marriages.

Wikipedia Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Something_So_Right_%28TV_series%29
eBay Link: View Something So Right on eBay

Boned When... (Login to Submit a Reason)

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1 Day 1 Sucked from the start.
3
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2 Never Boned Still rocks.
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Something So Right Comments (You must Login to Comment)

#Comments
1 Due to a resurgence in popularity of the iconic 1970's American family sitcom 'The Brady Bunch' in the 1990's, there were, at least, a couple of attempts, aside from Sherwood Schwartz's efforts with the actual Brady Bunch franchise, to create shows around the 'Blended Family' concept/formula and recapture that old television magic. One such attempt was the somewhat short lived family sitcom Something So Right. The ONLY reason I know anything at all about this show is that I was in the studio audience for the taping of the episode Something About Burning Bridges, Meat and Rugs with guest star Melanie Mayron. I had a professional acquaintance who worked crew on this show who was kind enough to get my wife and I tickets to a taping. At that time, I had never been to the taping of a real sitcom before and thought it would be an entertaining and educational experience (seeing as I was trying to break into the TV and Film industry at that time) and it was. Pardon the digression, but if you ever wish to attend a sitcom taping as an audience member, here are some pointers to keep in mind: A: If possible, familiarize yourself with the show, it's premise and the characters. You'll follow it so much better when you're in the studio live. That way you won't be saying to yourself "Now wait a minute. What's the deal with this family? Who is this guy? Is he a regular?", etc. B: Be sure you eat a meal BEFORE you go to the taping. Make it a filling meal, but not one that will make you uncomfortable or uhhhhh gassy. More on that in pointer C. C: Be certain it is a show you actually like. Believe me, if you can't manage to sit through a 30 minute episode of a show, making it through a taping of the same show as an audience member is sheer agony. Tapings are usually done in the evening, starting between 6 & 7, and can go upwards to 5-6 hours, possibly longer. That's why they typically have comedians who work the audience during setups to keep them fresh and entertained. Also, if you try to leave early, they will do everything in their power, short of bribing you with things of value, to get you to stay. D: Make sure you don't have anything planned early the next morning. Refer back to pointer C above. Anyway, back on subject. After attending the taping, I made it a point to catch some episodes on TV. It was pretty underwhelming to say the least and I can see why it was so short lived, on BOTH networks. It just wasn't a remarkable or terribly original show in my opinion. As I didn't follow the show outside the couple of episodes I caught, I can't really say for sure when the boning moment occurred. If anything, I suppose I could say that due to it being based upon a formula that had already been done, I'd go out on a limb and say Day One. -- Submitted By: (Friedrich_Feuerstein) on September 12, 2012, 11:01 am - (0 votes) - Login to Vote

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